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Introduction

During its long life, a tree may be subject to damage by animals, weather and other environmental conditions, insects, diseases, and fire. Inspect your woodland at the beginning and end of each growing season and whenever a fire, windstorm, ice storm, flooding, prolonged drought, or other such event may have caused damage.

It can be very costly to control damaging agents once they become established so it is wise to prevent damage before it occurs. To minimize damage:

Descriptions of common sources of tree damage follow, along with information about various types of damage, and their potential severity. Chapter 6: Managing Important Forest Types briefly describes the most common pests and diseases associated with different forest types and how to prevent or control them. Contact a forester to help you identify problems, assess damage, and design a control strategy for any serious problem. A forester also can help you plan stand management practices that will reduce future problems.

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Page 1 - http://woodlandstewardship.org/?page_id=315

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Page 4 - http://woodlandstewardship.org/?page_id=330

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