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Black Walnut   >Northern Pin Oak    


Northern Pin Oak

| Description | Products and Uses | Site Conditions |
| Regeneration | Immediate Treatments | Pests and Diseases |

Description

Northern pin oak occurs in pure stands or in varying mixtures with white oak, black oak, bur oak, northern red oak or jack pine. It also may be associated with red pine, eastern white pine, quaking aspen, bigtooth aspen, red maple, black cherry, and paper birch. It occurs mainly in east central Minnesota, central and northern Wisconsin, and central Michigan.

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Products and Uses

Pin oak acorns are excellent wildlife food. Timber quality tends to be poor, but northern pin oak is marketed as a red oak for lumber, railroad ties, and firewood. Northern pin oak acorns are important food for deer, turkeys, squirrels, ruffed grouse, and many other birds and small mammals.

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Site Conditions

Northern pin oak commonly grows on dry, acid, sandy soils with a very thin organic layer in sand plains and on gravelly slopes. On better quality sites, conversion to other oaks, red pine, jack pine, or white pine is recommended for timber production.

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Regeneration

As a minor forest type and a species with low economic value, little information is available about northern pin oak regeneration and management. It is intolerant of shade and will not reproduce under its own shade. Other oaks and white pine are less light demanding and tend to succeed it.

Acorns drop in the fall and germinate the following spring. The interval between good seed crops is estimated to be two toNorthern pin oak on a dry, sandy site five years. Acorn weevils and wildlife consume a large portion of the acorn crop, especially in poor seed years. Acorns fall below the canopy, but are dispersed much further by squirrels, blue jays, and other animals. Northern pin oak naturally regenerates on dry sites where few other tree species can survive. Natural regeneration is unreliable under poor site conditions, but can be increased by clearcutting oaks in the fall soon after a good acorn crop has dispersed. Scarify the site during logging by dragging a tree top across the site to help bury acorns. Planting acorns or seedlings of oak or pine is recommended to help ensure regeneration.

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Intermediate Treatments

Stand density is likely to be low because of poor site quality, but use intermediate harvests to thin dense patches, remove low quality trees, and adjust species composition. While northern pin oak is a satisfactory species for wildlife, in stands where your goal is timber production, favor other oaks and pines over northern pin oak during thinnings.

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Pests and Diseases

Oak wilt is a serious disease. Avoid wounding trees from April through July when insects that transport the disease are most active.

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